Other Legal Issues

Consumer

Criminal

  • This article introduces government seizure and forfeiture of personal property, explains the procedure, and provides information on how a property owner can respond when the government takes property.
  • In Maryland, effective October 1, 2014, possession or use of less than 10 grams of marijuana is no longer a criminal offense. Decriminalization replaces criminal penalties with civil penalties for possession of up to 10 grams of marijuana. Before October 1, 2014, the possession or use of any amount of marijuana is still a criminal offense.

Discrimination

  • There are a number of federal and state laws that prohibit discrimination because of age, race, color, gender, national origin, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity, religion, and pregnancy.

Divorce

Veterans' Services

Alcoholism/Substance Abuse

  • In Maryland, effective October 1, 2014, possession or use of less than 10 grams of marijuana is no longer a criminal offense. Decriminalization replaces criminal penalties with civil penalties for possession of up to 10 grams of marijuana. Before October 1, 2014, the possession or use of any amount of marijuana is still a criminal offense.

Youth

  • In Maryland, effective October 1, 2014, possession or use of less than 10 grams of marijuana is no longer a criminal offense. Decriminalization replaces criminal penalties with civil penalties for possession of up to 10 grams of marijuana. Before October 1, 2014, the possession or use of any amount of marijuana is still a criminal offense.

Health

  • In Maryland, effective October 1, 2014, possession or use of less than 10 grams of marijuana is no longer a criminal offense. Decriminalization replaces criminal penalties with civil penalties for possession of up to 10 grams of marijuana. Before October 1, 2014, the possession or use of any amount of marijuana is still a criminal offense.

Homeownership

  • May I keep chickens on my property? What are the rules in my city or county?
  • This article describes a general process for giving away property rights to someone else for no money. For example, you may wish to make a gift of property, or you may wish to add a family member to your deed. You should be aware that simply adding someone to a property deed can have very different results depending on the exact words used in the new deed. If you are buying or selling property, it is important to get professional help.

Landlord/Tenant

Discrimination Issues

  • There are a number of federal and state laws that prohibit discrimination because of age, race, color, gender, national origin, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity, religion, and pregnancy.

Wills/Estates/Probate

  • This article describes a general process for giving away property rights to someone else for no money. For example, you may wish to make a gift of property, or you may wish to add a family member to your deed. You should be aware that simply adding someone to a property deed can have very different results depending on the exact words used in the new deed. If you are buying or selling property, it is important to get professional help.
  • This article describes a general process for giving away property rights to someone else for no money. For example, you may wish to make a gift of property, or you may wish to add a family member to your deed. You should be aware that simply adding someone to a property deed can have very different results depending on the exact words used in the new deed. If you are buying or selling property, it is important to get professional help.

Youth Law

  • In Maryland, effective October 1, 2014, possession or use of less than 10 grams of marijuana is no longer a criminal offense. Decriminalization replaces criminal penalties with civil penalties for possession of up to 10 grams of marijuana. Before October 1, 2014, the possession or use of any amount of marijuana is still a criminal offense.

Civil Rights

  • Civil rights generally refers to the rights that individuals living in the United States have under the United States Constitution , certain federal laws, the Maryland constitution and certain state laws.
  • There are a number of federal and state laws that prohibit discrimination because of age, race, color, gender, national origin, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity, religion, and pregnancy.
  • Several federal statutes (laws) allow people whose civil rights have been violated to sue the violator(s).
  • In addition to the general requirements you must meet in order to vote in Maryland, there are special rules if you have been convicted of certain crimes and/or are currently under certain restrictions within the criminal justice system.
  • The Fifteenth Amendment (Amendment XV) to the United States Constitution prohibits each government in the United States from denying a citizen the right to vote based on that citizen's "race, color, or previous condition of servitude" (i.e., slavery). It was ratified on February 3, 1870.

Immigration

  • American immigration law is federal law, so it is the same in all states of the United States.

Land Records

  • This article describes a general process for giving away property rights to someone else for no money. For example, you may wish to make a gift of property, or you may wish to add a family member to your deed. You should be aware that simply adding someone to a property deed can have very different results depending on the exact words used in the new deed. If you are buying or selling property, it is important to get professional help.

Maryland Small Business

  • This article provides an introduction to cooperatives, as well as an overview of the considerations involved in creating a cooperative. A cooperative is a business or nonprofit organization owned and operated by the people who either use or provide its services. Cooperatives exist in nearly every sector of the economy and employ millions of people each year.
  • If someone else helps you to prepare your taxes, you can check out their credentials.
  • This article explains what a Community Development Corporation (CDC) is and sets forth some of the steps to starting one in Maryland.
  • Most businesses operating in Maryland must file a report by April 15 each year to maintain "good standing" with SDAT, the State Department of Assessment and Taxation. Without "good standing," a business may lose limited liability or other legal protections associated with being a corporation, limited liability company (LLC), limited partnership (LP), limited liability partnership (LLP), or certain types of trusts or farms.
  • This article describes how to create a nonprofit organization.
  • This article covers what a small family child care provider must include in a contract with parents under the Maryland regulations known as COMAR Title 13A, Subtitle 15.

Personal Injury

  • You are likely to find a "contingency fee" in personal injury cases, accidental claims, property damage cases, or other cases where a large amount of money is in contention.
  • For a number of reasons, personal injury is an area of the law that is generally not suited to self-representation. This section will give you an overview of the law, give you some tips on things to look out for and help you to find an attorney.
  • Generally, recoveries for physical harm are not taxable. Other types of monetary settlements are taxable.

Taxes

Veterans/Military

Other Legal Issues

Is this legal advice?

This site offers legal information, not legal advice.  We make every effort to ensure the accuracy of the information and to clearly explain your options.  However we do not provide legal advice - the application of the law to your individual circumstances. For legal advice, you should consult an attorney.  The Maryland State Law Library, a court-related agency of the Maryland Judiciary, sponsors this site.  In the absence of file-specific attribution or copyright, the Maryland State Law Library may hold the copyright to parts of this website. You are free to copy the information for your own use or for other non-commercial purposes with the following language “Source: Maryland's People’s Law Library – www.peoples-law.org. © Maryland State Law Library, 2014.”

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